Thursday, November 5, 2015

Five Spice Pork Steak with Teriyaki Sauce, Wasabi Mayonnaise and Pickled Ginger








     A Simple Fusion Style Hearty Pork Steak!
     Pork Shoulder Blade Steaks are one of the cheapest cuts of meat that there is.  The big Pork Blade Steak in the photos cost about $1.75 at a grocery store.  Pork Blade Steaks are great for budget minded people and they can easily be fancied up.
     It pays to be selective when choosing a Pork Blade Steak at a grocery store.  It is best to try to find a Pork Blade Steak that does not have too much fat or bone.  A Lean Pork Blade Steak will still have plenty of fat to keep the meat tender and juicy. 
     Many grocery store butchers use a little bit of deceptive marketing practice when packaging meats.  This is especially true for packaged Pork Blade Steaks.  For example, a Blade Steak is placed on a styrofoam tray and it is wrapped with clear plastic wrap.  A shopper can only see one side of the Pork Blade Steak.  If one side of the Blade Steak is extra fatty, the butcher will package the steak so the customer only sees the lean side of the steak.  A customer that purchases the steak will surely be disappointed when the package is opened at home.
     My advice is to purchase Pork Blade Steaks that are laid out in the glass display case in the grocery store butcher shop.  This way the entire Blade Steak can be inspected before purchasing.
     If all of Pork Blade Steak are packaged and wrapped, a shopper can rely on intuitive powers to judge whether the other side of the Blade Steak looks acceptable, but this is guesswork.
     The better solution is to simply ask a meat department worker to open the package up, so the Blade Steak can be inspected before making a purchase.  If the Blade Steak is acceptable, the worker will seal the package back up.  If the Blade Steak is unacceptable, ask the meat department worker to keep on opening packages till one is found that looks good.  Being a "pain in the neck" customer is a good way to put an end to deceptive marketing practices in a grocery store meat department!
     As a shopper, it is important to remember that money is power.  If a shopper has the money, the shopper has the power.  Never feel shy about making quality control demands before making a purchase at a meat department in a grocery store!  

     Wasabi can be purchased as a dry powder and mixed with mayonnaise to make Wasabi Mayonnaise.  Pre-prepared Wasabi Mayonnaise Sauce packaged in a squeeze bottle can be found in Asian markets and at most common grocery stores.  I decided to give this product a try.  Squeeze bottles Wasabi Mayonnaise Sauce are a nice convenience and they make painting a plate for a fancy food presentation easy to do.
     Sliced sushi grade pickled ginger is also available at Asian markets and most grocery stores.  Pickled ginger is zesty and it lightens the flavor of savory food or rich sauces on a plate.  Ginger also is a natural blood thinner, so medicinally speaking, pickled ginger is a good accompaniment choice for Pork Blade Steak, which has a higher than average cholesterol content.

     *This entire recipe yields 1 large pork steak.  This is enough for 1 guest that has a big appetite or 2 guests that prefer petite portions. 
   
     Five Spice Marinated Pork Steak:
     Step 1:  Select a 10 to 12 ounce pork shoulder blade steak.
     Place the blade steak in a container.
     Step 2:  Add 2 tablespoons of thin soy sauce.
     Add 1/2 tablespoon of rice vinegar.
     Add 1/4 teaspoon of Chinese five spice powder.
     Add 1 tablespoon of minced ginger.
     Add 2 chopped garlic cloves.
     Add 2 pinches of sea salt and white pepper.
     Mix the ingredients together.
     Step 3:  Add enough water to barely cover the pork steak.
     Marinate the pork steak in a refrigerator for 2 to 4 hours.
   
     Japanese Teriyaki Sauce: 
     Step 1:  Place 3 tablespoons of soy sauce in a small sauce pot.
     Add 3 tablespoons of sugar.
     Add 1/2 cup of water.
     Step 2:  Place the sauce pot over low heat.
     Simmer and reduce till the sauce is a thin syrup consistency that can glaze a spoon.
     Step 3:  Place the teriyaki sauce in a ceramic cup or small plastic squeeze bottle.
     Keep the sauce warm on a stove top.
   
     Five Spice Pork Steak:
     Step 1:  Remove the pork blade steak from the marinade.
     Brush off any ginger or garlic that clings to the pork steak.
     Discard the marinade.
     Step 2:  Heat a sauté pan over medium/medium high heat.
     Add 1 1/2 tablespoons of vegetable oil.
     Place the pork steak in the pan.
     Pan sear the pork steak till it is lightly browned on both sides.
     Step 3:  Reduce the temperature to low heat.
     Add 1/2 tablespoon of thin soy sauce.
     Add 1 cup of water.
     Add 1 pinch of five spice powder.
     Add 1/3 cup of rice wine.
     Add 3 drops of pure sesame oil.
     Step 4:  Simmer the pork steak in the braising liquid.  Flip the steak a few times so it braises evenly.
     Simmer and reduce till the braising sauce clings to the pork steak.
     Remove the pan from the heat.
   
     Five Spice Pork Steak with Teriyaki Sauce, Wasabi Mayonnaise and Pickled Ginger:
     For an Asian style presentation, it is customary to slice the steak before it is served, so the pieces can be eaten with chopsticks.
     Place the five spice pork steak on a large plate.
     Use the squirt bottle to paint Wasabi Mayonnaise Sauce streaks on the plate.
     Place several small dabs of chopped thin sliced pickled ginger on the plate.
     Use a spoon or small plastic squirt bottle to drizzle some teriyaki sauce on the pork steak and plate.
     Serve with vegetables and steamed rice on the side.
    
      This is a very nice summertime entree that does not cost a fortune to make!  Painting the sauce streaks in one direction creates an interesting visual effect.

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